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Putin's Unprecedented Bid: Staggering Incentives Offered for New Recruits as Russia Strives to Fortify Dwindling Forces

"Economic Analysts and Military Experts Decode Biden-Xi Summit Expectations Amidst Putin's Unconventional Military Recruitment Drive"

As the world anticipates the outcome of President Biden's crucial meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the APEC summit in San Francisco, economist Mark Toth and former U.S. Army Col. Jonathan Sweet provide insights into the geopolitical landscape. Meanwhile, Moscow's desperation to fortify its dwindling forces in Ukraine takes an unexpected turn as Russian President Vladimir Putin resorts to a staggering recruitment strategy.

Rebekah Koffler, a strategic military intelligence analyst and author of "Putin’s Playbook," reveals that Putin has initiated an extensive recruitment campaign amid the prolonged conflict in Ukraine. Analysis from The Atlantic Council unveils a unique approach, where Russian armed forces tap into the civilian population for fundraising through a group named "All for Victory," led by propagandist Vladimir Solovyov.

In an astonishing move, potential recruits for the "elite division" are offered a substantial payment of 1 million rubles (approximately $11,000). This incentive, highlighted by various pro-military accounts on Telegram, follows a prior attempt in October to hire contractors for around 600,000 rubles (around $6,600). The Russian media landscape, from Izvestia to Moscow Young Communist, carries announcements about the recruitment drive for this "elite combat division."

According to Koffler, Putin's approach signifies a covert mobilization, suggesting preparation for an extended conflict in Ukraine. Drawing on his background as a former KGB operative, Putin employs covert tactics to obscure the true situation. Koffler emphasizes the potential grim fate awaiting these recruits, characterizing their deployment as entering a "meat-grinder."

As the global community observes Putin's unconventional tactics, the Kremlin hints at an eventual successor while affirming a continuity of leadership style. The developments unfold against the backdrop of high-stakes diplomatic engagements, adding a layer of complexity to the evolving geopolitical landscape.

"The Hidden Costs of Putin's Recruitment Drive: Unveiling the Toll of Russia's Conflicted Military Strategy"

Revelations from the U.K. Ministry of Defense paint a grim picture of Russia's toll in the ongoing conflict, indicating "permanent" casualties ranging from 150,000 to 190,000, including discharges due to injuries. The wounded count rises to nearly 300,000, excluding groups like the Wagner Group and "prisoner battalions" involved in the Bakhmut region. In February, the ministry specified a figure of 40,000 to 60,000 dead.

Reports from the anti-war initiative "Idite Lesom" in Georgia shed light on desperate measures taken by the Russian military to bolster its forces. Recruits in various regions, including Tatarstan, Bashkortostan, and Irkutsk, have received text messages advertising "contract services." The Russian government's attempts to entice troops from neighboring Kazakhstan, despite its stance against the invasion, involved significant financial incentives, including over 450,000 rubles (approximately $5,000) and additional undisclosed benefits.

Rebekah Koffler, a strategic military intelligence analyst, emphasizes the enticing promises made by Putin to potential recruits, ranging from compensation for rent and free transportation to psychological assistance and free college education. However, she cautions against falling for these promises, noting that in the high-risk environment of a combat zone, the reality renders these benefits inconsequential.

As Putin's recruitment drive unfolds, the hidden costs become increasingly evident. The toll on Russian forces and the ethical implications of enticing young men with promises that may prove irrelevant in the face of the harsh realities of war underscore the complexity of Russia's military strategy and the human consequences of conflict.

"The Disturbing Legacy of Yevgeny Prigozhin: Russia's Mercenary Maverick and the Unsettling Recruitment of a Suicide Squad"

In a macabre turn of military strategy, Yevgeny Prigozhin, the late founder of Russia's notorious Wagner mercenaries, orchestrated a chilling recruitment effort involving criminals from prisons. The scheme resembled a suicide squad arrangement, with the promise of freedom granted to those who survived six months on the front lines. Despite drawing intense criticism, Prigozhin justified the move, asserting that using criminals was preferable to conscripting what he derogatorily termed "dandelion boys" from the civilian population.

Prigozhin's provocative question — "Would you rather have the murderer going to war, or your family members?" — resonated as both a defiance of conventional morality and a haunting prophecy. The controversial figure met his end over the summer when his plane exploded in exile following a failed coup attempt against the Russian military command.

The prison recruitment initiative adds a disturbing layer to Prigozhin's legacy, raising ethical questions about the means employed to bolster Russian forces. As the nation grapples with the aftermath of his demise, the unsettling echoes of his unorthodox military strategies linger, underscoring the complexities and consequences of Russia's unconventional approach to conflict. This report is contributed by Peter Aitken, a Fox News Digital reporter covering national and global news.

In conclusion, the legacy of Yevgeny Prigozhin, the late founder of Russia's Wagner mercenaries, casts a haunting shadow over the nation's military strategies. The unsettling revelation of Prigozhin's recruitment of criminals from prisons for a suicide squad-style arrangement adds a disturbing chapter to his controversial history. Despite facing heavy criticism, Prigozhin defended his approach, arguing that using criminals was a preferable alternative to conscripting what he disparagingly referred to as "dandelion boys" from the civilian population.

Prigozhin's provocative question — whether one would prefer murderers going to war or their family members — now stands as a chilling prophecy. His demise over the summer, marked by a plane explosion in exile following a failed coup attempt, leaves behind a legacy that continues to raise ethical questions about the means employed to strengthen Russian forces.

As the nation grapples with the aftermath of Prigozhin's death, the echoes of his unorthodox military strategies linger, underscoring the complexities and consequences of Russia's unconventional approach to conflict. The unsettling nature of his recruitment initiatives and their potential impact on the nation's military landscape further emphasizes the disturbing and lasting imprint of this controversial figure on Russia's military history. This report, contributed by Peter Aitken, a Fox News Digital reporter covering national and global news, serves as a stark reminder of the ethical quandaries and challenges inherent in the pursuit of military strength.

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